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Williams remarked that he liked a certain painting. He suspected a joke; the name R Mutt struck him, understandably, as "fishy".

Walter Arensberg countered by pointing out that the correct fee had been paid.

From early on, however, Duchamp seemed tempted to subvert the whole enterprise.

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"'You mean to say, if a man sent in horse manure glued to a canvas that we would have to accept it! 'I'm afraid we would,' said Walter." In the event, the board narrowly voted not to show Fountain, and, according to one account, it was hidden behind a screen.

Duchamp must have been pleased with his work, quite apart from the satisfactory ruckus it caused, because shortly afterwards he arranged to have it photographed by Alfred Stieglitz, taking a good deal of trouble over the result.

This idea was adopted, despite protests that it was "democracy run riot".

As a result, the whole huge show - the largest ever assembled in the US - must have had a slightly absurd air, with traditionalist, amateur works sent in from the sticks hung randomly beside pieces of cutting-edge cubism.

Here was an unmentionable object - press reports at the time referred to it as a "bathroom appliance" - it was signed and dated, but was it a work of art? This deadpan style of question was very much Duchamp's technique. He had me beat all right, if that was the objective. " George Bellows, a leading painter of a gritty, realist persuasion and member of the board of the Society of Independent Artists, was similarly outraged by Fountain.

At the Arensbergs' salon - "an inconceivable orgy of sexuality, jazz and alcohol", according to Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia, wife of the artist Picabia who frequented it, as did Man Ray - Duchamp demoralised the writer William Carlos Williams with a similar query. I could have sunk through the floor, ground my teeth, turned my back on him and spat." It must have been the way Duchamp asked this apparently innocuous question - with underlying implications of "Do you really like it? According to Beatrice Wood, a young artist then in love with Duchamp, Bellows complained that it could not be exhibited as it was indecent.This image is the only remaining record of the original object.It was reproduced with an anonymous manifesto the following May in an avant-garde magazine called The Blind Man.It was unexpectedly a rather beautiful object in its own right and a blindingly brilliant logical move, check-mating all conventional ideas about art.But it was also a highly successful practical joke.It was to show works by anyone, subject to a fee of

At the Arensbergs' salon - "an inconceivable orgy of sexuality, jazz and alcohol", according to Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia, wife of the artist Picabia who frequented it, as did Man Ray - Duchamp demoralised the writer William Carlos Williams with a similar query. I could have sunk through the floor, ground my teeth, turned my back on him and spat." It must have been the way Duchamp asked this apparently innocuous question - with underlying implications of "Do you really like it? According to Beatrice Wood, a young artist then in love with Duchamp, Bellows complained that it could not be exhibited as it was indecent.This image is the only remaining record of the original object.It was reproduced with an anonymous manifesto the following May in an avant-garde magazine called The Blind Man.It was unexpectedly a rather beautiful object in its own right and a blindingly brilliant logical move, check-mating all conventional ideas about art.But it was also a highly successful practical joke.It was to show works by anyone, subject to a fee of $1 for membership and $5 annual dues.

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At the Arensbergs' salon - "an inconceivable orgy of sexuality, jazz and alcohol", according to Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia, wife of the artist Picabia who frequented it, as did Man Ray - Duchamp demoralised the writer William Carlos Williams with a similar query. I could have sunk through the floor, ground my teeth, turned my back on him and spat." It must have been the way Duchamp asked this apparently innocuous question - with underlying implications of "Do you really like it? According to Beatrice Wood, a young artist then in love with Duchamp, Bellows complained that it could not be exhibited as it was indecent.

This image is the only remaining record of the original object.

It was reproduced with an anonymous manifesto the following May in an avant-garde magazine called The Blind Man.

It was unexpectedly a rather beautiful object in its own right and a blindingly brilliant logical move, check-mating all conventional ideas about art.

But it was also a highly successful practical joke.

It was to show works by anyone, subject to a fee of $1 for membership and $5 annual dues.

||

At the Arensbergs' salon - "an inconceivable orgy of sexuality, jazz and alcohol", according to Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia, wife of the artist Picabia who frequented it, as did Man Ray - Duchamp demoralised the writer William Carlos Williams with a similar query. I could have sunk through the floor, ground my teeth, turned my back on him and spat." It must have been the way Duchamp asked this apparently innocuous question - with underlying implications of "Do you really like it? According to Beatrice Wood, a young artist then in love with Duchamp, Bellows complained that it could not be exhibited as it was indecent.

This image is the only remaining record of the original object.

It was reproduced with an anonymous manifesto the following May in an avant-garde magazine called The Blind Man.

It was unexpectedly a rather beautiful object in its own right and a blindingly brilliant logical move, check-mating all conventional ideas about art.

for membership and annual dues.

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