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Among the few non-eroticized fictional gynoids include Rosie the Robot Maid from The Jetsons.

However, she still has some stereotypically feminine qualities, such as a matronly shape and a predisposition to cry.

It was called simply "36C", from her chest measurement, and had a 16-bit microprocessor and voice synthesiser that allowed primitive responses to speech and push button inputs.

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The stereotypical role of wifedom has also been explored through use of gynoids.

In The Stepford Wives, husbands are shown as desiring to restrict the independence of their wives, and obedient and stereotypical spouses are preferred.

In a parody of the fembots from The Bionic Woman, attractive, blonde fembots in alluring baby-doll nightgowns were used as a lure for the fictional agent Austin Powers in the movie Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery.

The film's sequels had cameo appearances of characters revealed as fembots.

As more realistic humanoid robot design is technologically possible, they are also emerging in real-life robot design. Robotess is the oldest female-specific term, originating in 1921 from the same source as the term robot.

A gynoid is anything that resembles or pertains to the female human form.

Probably most famous, however, is Pygmalion, one of the earliest conceptualizations of constructions similar to gynoids in literary history, from Ovid's account of Pygmalion.

In this myth a female statue is sculpted that is so beautiful that the creator falls in love with it, and after praying to Venus, the goddess takes pity on him and converts the statue into a real woman, Galatea, with whom Pygmalion has children.

Jack Halberstam writes that these gynoids inform the viewer that femaleness does not indicate naturalness, and their exaggerated femininity and sexuality is used in a similar way to the title character's exaggerated masculinity, lampooning stereotypes.

Feminist critic Patricia Melzer writes in Alien Constructions: Science Fiction and Feminist Thought that gynoids in Richard Calder's Dead Girls are inextricably linked to men's lust, and are mainly designed as sex objects, having no use beyond "pleasing men's violent sexual desires".

While not truly artificially intelligent, the fembots still had extremely sophisticated programming that allowed them to pass for human in most situations.

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