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UNIVAC 1100 machines used one's complement representation of negative numbers, as opposed to the two's complement form almost universal today.In one's complement, where zero is a to contend with.FANG was freely available, first released in 1972, and was used by hundreds of UNIVAC sites.

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To view this document, you need a browser which supports frames. Thanks to volunteer archivists and packrats across the Internet, here is a collection of documents, including user manuals, sales brochures, and articles about the UNIVAC 1100 series spanning the era from the 1107 through the 1100/80.

The year is 1974, and a few lines of clever code in the operating system idle loop seem to be provoking crashes of a massive UNIVAC 1110 mainframe. UNIVAC has been, over the years, a registered trademark of Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation, Remington Rand Corporation, Sperry Rand Corporation, Sperry Corporation, and Unisys Corporation.

In 1971, John Walker figured out how to convert a multi-million dollar room-sized UNIVAC 1108 mainframe into a Morse Ever heard the one about the self-reproducing ANIMAL program that spread throughout systems and colonised new machines? Here's the story, both as it actually happened, and recounted in the press as a “computer urban legend” 10 and 15 years after the fact. FANG was one of the rare applications to fully exploit the multi-tasking, multi-processor, and multiple I/O channel architecture of the UNIVAC 1100 series.

A file and tape utility, it allowed simultaneous execution of any number of commands, while guaranteeing results identical to the much slower serial execution employed by UNIVAC's own utilities.

The durable 24-inch carbon steel, magnum-contoured, rifle-sighted barrel features a satin-blued finish for a striking appearance.

The Model 700 50th Anniversary rifle is chambered in 7mm Remington Magnum.

The classic look continues with a satin-finished B grade American walnut stock with right-handed cheek piece.

Enhancing the classic look of the stock are cut fleur-de-lis style checkering, period-style white-line spacers on the black fore-end and pistol-grip caps, as well as a black-vented recoil pad.

In 1968 you could pick up a 1.3 MHz CPU with half a megabyte of RAM and 100 megabyte hard drive for a mere US

The Model 700 50th Anniversary rifle is chambered in 7mm Remington Magnum.The classic look continues with a satin-finished B grade American walnut stock with right-handed cheek piece.Enhancing the classic look of the stock are cut fleur-de-lis style checkering, period-style white-line spacers on the black fore-end and pistol-grip caps, as well as a black-vented recoil pad.In 1968 you could pick up a 1.3 MHz CPU with half a megabyte of RAM and 100 megabyte hard drive for a mere US$1.6 million. What UNIVAC programmer can ever forget the day he or she found a way to use an instruction like “Magnitude of Characteristic Difference to Upper”?Here are all the instructions for the 1100 family from the 1107 to 1110, colour-coded to indicate which machine included what instructions, with SLEUTH I and SLEUTH II mnemonics.If they can put a man on the Moon, why can't they put a UNIVAC 1108 in your shirt pocket? Back in the '60s, almost every mainframe computer had its own character code. Programmers of the mainframe era tended to be better typists than those who started with timesharing terminals or personal computers. Because the only way to get your program into the computer was to punch it on cards, and as you discovered within seconds after sitting down at the keypunch, “you can't erase a hole”.

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The Model 700 50th Anniversary rifle is chambered in 7mm Remington Magnum.

The classic look continues with a satin-finished B grade American walnut stock with right-handed cheek piece.

Enhancing the classic look of the stock are cut fleur-de-lis style checkering, period-style white-line spacers on the black fore-end and pistol-grip caps, as well as a black-vented recoil pad.

In 1968 you could pick up a 1.3 MHz CPU with half a megabyte of RAM and 100 megabyte hard drive for a mere US$1.6 million. What UNIVAC programmer can ever forget the day he or she found a way to use an instruction like “Magnitude of Characteristic Difference to Upper”?

Here are all the instructions for the 1100 family from the 1107 to 1110, colour-coded to indicate which machine included what instructions, with SLEUTH I and SLEUTH II mnemonics.

If they can put a man on the Moon, why can't they put a UNIVAC 1108 in your shirt pocket? Back in the '60s, almost every mainframe computer had its own character code. Programmers of the mainframe era tended to be better typists than those who started with timesharing terminals or personal computers. Because the only way to get your program into the computer was to punch it on cards, and as you discovered within seconds after sitting down at the keypunch, “you can't erase a hole”.

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The Model 700 50th Anniversary rifle is chambered in 7mm Remington Magnum.

The classic look continues with a satin-finished B grade American walnut stock with right-handed cheek piece.

Enhancing the classic look of the stock are cut fleur-de-lis style checkering, period-style white-line spacers on the black fore-end and pistol-grip caps, as well as a black-vented recoil pad.

In 1968 you could pick up a 1.3 MHz CPU with half a megabyte of RAM and 100 megabyte hard drive for a mere US$1.6 million. What UNIVAC programmer can ever forget the day he or she found a way to use an instruction like “Magnitude of Characteristic Difference to Upper”?

.6 million. What UNIVAC programmer can ever forget the day he or she found a way to use an instruction like “Magnitude of Characteristic Difference to Upper”?

Here are all the instructions for the 1100 family from the 1107 to 1110, colour-coded to indicate which machine included what instructions, with SLEUTH I and SLEUTH II mnemonics.

If they can put a man on the Moon, why can't they put a UNIVAC 1108 in your shirt pocket? Back in the '60s, almost every mainframe computer had its own character code. Programmers of the mainframe era tended to be better typists than those who started with timesharing terminals or personal computers. Because the only way to get your program into the computer was to punch it on cards, and as you discovered within seconds after sitting down at the keypunch, “you can't erase a hole”.

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