Intimidating paintball masks

The use of masks in rituals or ceremonies is a very ancient human practice across the world, One of the challenges in anthropology is finding the precise derivation of human culture and early activities, with the invention and use of the mask only one area of unsolved inquiry. It is conjectured that the first masks may have generally been used by primitive people to associate the wearer with some kind of unimpeachable authority, such as "the gods" or to otherwise lend credence to the person's claim on a given social role.

The oldest masks that have been discovered are 9,000 years old, being held by the Musée "Bible et Terre Sainte" (Paris), and the Israel Museum (Jerusalem).

intimidating paintball masks-69

They are usually worn on the face, although they may also be positioned for effect elsewhere on the wearer's body.

In parts of Australia, giant totem masks cover the body, whilst Inuit women use finger masks during storytelling and dancing.

And oddly enough, for all the lack of safety compliance, the factory's door will be unlocked or easily entered, and there will be Usually all the crushing, spiking, and burning machinery will be left to run unattended; but if this is not the case, they will all be activated by a single exposed switch placed on a bare stretch of wall.

In short, if the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (or the local counterpart in non-American/European settings) ever saw the place, it would be condemned in .

Granted, it's always possible to put together a dramatic fight sequence in a perfectly balanced tournament-style environment (see the last segment of , or virtually any movie where martial arts is the foundation of the plot), but the ultimate authority on such matters in entertainment is, of course, the Rule of Cool.

These facilities are also often referred to as "Smoke and Fire Factories", in reference to the fact that the function of the building is rarely explained, with smoke and fire as its only discernible outputs.

However, it may also come from Provençal mascarar "to black (the face)" (or the related Catalan mascarar, Old French mascurer).

This in turn is of uncertain origin — perhaps from a Germanic source akin to English "mesh", but perhaps from mask- "black", a borrowing from a pre-Indo-European language.

The Enrichment Center apologizes for this inconvenience and wishes you the best of luck.

Comments are closed.